‘The Brontë Project’ by Jennifer Vandever: A Novel of Passion, Desire, and Good PR

‘The Brontë Project’ by Jennifer Vandever: A Novel of Passion, Desire, and Good PR

A long time ago, I was killing time in the outlet bookshop at the railway station in Girona –something I would always do when I travelled from there– when I stumbled upon a book that wasn’t supposed to be among all that nonsensical collection of cheap and worthless publications.

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The book in question was The Brontë Project by Jennifer Vandever. I instantly thought I was going to have an amusing trip. That finding had made my day, and I couldn’t believe how lucky I was!

Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights had become my favourite novel long before. And then, thanks to The Brontë Project, I started exploring more the literary world of the three Brontë sisters.

Synopsis

The Brontë Project is an irreverent and comic look at love, loss, literature, and pop culture, and a guide to reconciling the mythology of romance with the reality of modern love.

Young scholar Sara Frost’s unsuccessful search for the lost love letters of Charlotte Brontë hasn’t won her any favor at her university, particularly now that the glamorous and self-promoting Princess Diana expert, Claire Vigee, has introduced her media-savvy exploits to the staid halls of academia.

But it’s not until Sara’s fiancé suddenly leaves that she begins to question her life’s vocation and is forced to reconcile the mythology of romance with the reality of modern love.

Sara’s jolt brings her to an unusual new world and a Hollywood producer who mistakenly assumes that the short, sad life of Charlotte Brontë has the makings of the next “feel good” movie blockbuster.

Along the way, Sara discovers that the life and writings of Charlotte Brontë may have taught her more than she ever guessed about the virtues of being a romantic with the heart of a pragmatist.” (Goodreads)

Read the first chapter for free

The following is an excerpt from the first chapter of the novel:

Fate affords some lovers only one opportunity to meet. Others it allows endless opportunities, so that their coupling seems more like the work of fate’s fair-haired cousin, serendipity. Whatever the circumstances, any number of preconditions must gather around this fortuitous event. In the case of Sara and Paul it was the combination of a graduate seminar on the modern British novel, a boring holiday party, Anglophilia in general, and Paul’s vague resemblance to a young Laurence Olivier in particular. They had so capitalized on their good fortune that six years after the fact they stood side by side, surveying the crowd, both eyeing the door and drinking a cheap merlot from plastic cups.

You can read the first chapter of the novel for free on The New York Times website or you can buy the book at Amazon.com.

Happy reading! 🙂

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